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Storytelling

Heroic Storytelling

By | Events, Storytelling, Workshops | 4 Comments

When I was ten, my class spent a year learning about the Vikings. I nominated myself to be the village Bard and wrote my first novel, ‘The Greatest Honour of All’, about a young Viking girl who is killed in heroic battle and given a chieftain’s burial in a ship set on fire and pushed out to sea. It started strongly, but became stuck in the middle– now I realise I was having the usual problems with the notoriously difficult second act – and then jumped abruptly to my big ending where the burning ship holding the corpse of my heroine was…

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Story Structure One Day Workshop: Byron Bay Writers Festival

By | Events, Storytelling | No Comments

You wouldn’t build a house that had no supporting beams, no foundation and no ceiling. Neither can you tell a satisfying story without having certain structural elements in place. This one day workshop will introduce participants to the basic elements of three act structure and help them learn how to identify and strengthen these elements in their own work. Tuesday 1st August, Byron Bay Writers Festival, Byron Bay, NSW, Australia For booking and other details, please go to: https://byronwritersfestival.com/whats-on/workshop-laura-bloom/

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The Outsiders

By | Life, Storytelling | 2 Comments

I’ve always felt like an outsider. I was born late, the last of my generation in my large extended family. I was too young to participate in my family’s life while it was all happening, and by the time I reached those milestones of family holidays and celebrations, I often as not did them with just my mother, or by myself. As I grew older I went to schools in other, far flung parts of Sydney – many long bus rides away. The area we lived in – Glebe – was mainly a slum then, and I was a middle class…

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The review a writer dreams of …

By | Storytelling | No Comments

From The Weekend Australian, October 29th, 2016: Some novels owe their relevance to the moment in history defined by their theme and the actors who live the narrative. Others transcend time and place because of the universality of their argument, their characters and the landscape from which the narrative is drawn. Laura Bloom’s superb new novel, The Cleanskin, sits in the latter category and is destined to become a classic of its genre. Substitute the Northern Ireland sequences of this novel with any of today’s war-ravaged battlegrounds, and the secrets that haunt the protagonists could define almost any victim and perpetrator of past…

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Of pearls, beautiful young men and fine linen: an appreciation of Cheri.

By | Storytelling | 2 Comments

One of my favourite novels is Cheri, by the French author, Colette. It tells the story of a beautiful young man who is cossetted and spoiled by his mistress – in the dominating sense of that word – and lover, Léa, an older woman (although I have just discovered, disturbingly that in the first book she’s 49, just two years older than me). The book opens in Léa’s boudoir, where she is dressing, and Chéri is lounging on her messy bed, naked except for a long string of Léa’s pearls. ‘Give them to me,’ he says, commanding, then pleading, then seductive….

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